Cat Vaccination | Cat flu | Feline enteritis | Leukaemia virus | Mildmay Veterinary Hospital

I f you have any concerns, you should talk to your vet. Testing is available to determine the FeLV status of your cat. FeLV requires direct contact with an infected cat, and therefore isolated indoor cats are at minimal risk. It causes a local infection of the mucous membranes of the eyes but may also lead to some mild respiratory signs. Then the vaccination recommendations for the inside only cats will change, based on the exposure to outside cats in the household. Feline leukemia is a significant cause of illness and death in cats.

Unknowingly, cats infected and carrying the virus, often appear healthy for many years. It causes a local infection of the mucous membranes of the eyes but may also lead some mild respiratory signs. The vaccine can be administered at nine weeks of age or older, when needed, and should be boostered three to four weeks later. Find out more about what to do in an out of hours emergency. Vaccination is highly effective at protecting cats from disease, but regular boosters are required. Recovered cats can continue to carry and spread the infection for long periods, and can show signs of the disease again if they become stressed.

More advanced forms of the virus are more severe and can cause fatality. While the risk of infection to non-infected cats is certainly elevated, they still may not contract the disease. Fortunately, the death rate is low except in young kittens, but the disease is distressing and may persist for several weeks. It can be passed from mother to kittens through the placenta. It is highly contagious and causes sneezing, coughing, runny eyes, nasal discharge, loss of appetite and tongue ulcers. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) Feline AIDS is a disease caused by infection with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and affects the cat’s immune system.

Feline respiratory disease affects cats of all ages, especially young kittens, Siamese and Burmese cats. Feline respiratory disease affects cats of all ages, especially young kittens, Siamese and Burmese cats. They may excrete the virus when they become stressed or ill, causing repeated bouts of illness. Kittens receive their initial vaccination between 6-8 weeks of age, and then require booster vaccines given at 12 weeks of age and 16 weeks of age. Pregnant cats may lose their young or give birth to kittens with abnormalities, quite often with brain damage. Such cats will carry the virus sometimes for several years without showing any sign of disease.

Cats that do recover may continue to carry the virus for some time and infect other cats. While not typically life threatening, they can make cats very sick. Once a cat becomes infected by parvovirus, the virus invades the intestines and bone marrow. Following vaccination your cat may be off-colour for a day or two, or have some slight swelling or tenderness at the injection site. Also, if your cat catches one of these viruses, there’s a high probability that she’ll never be rid of it, in which case she’ll become a carrier cat who spreads the disease to other furry friends. Your cat may live indoors, but it is easy for pets to escape.

The vaccine against calicivirus did not induce a significant increase in antibody titers in either tigers or lions. Kittens are ‘temporarily’ protected against many diseases by antibodies received through their mother’s milk. If cats don’t run the risk of encountering disease, why do they need core vaccines (or titers) every three years? Responsible pet care requires kittens to be given their initial course of vaccinations, but this cannot protect them for the rest of their lives. Responsible pet care requires kittens to be given their initial course of vaccinations, but this cannot protect them for the rest of their lives. FELINE VIRAL RHINOTRACHEITIS: This is a severe upper respiratory infection that is most dangerous to young kittens and older cats.

Responsible pet care requires kittens to be given their initial course of vaccinations, but this cannot protect them for the rest of their lives. There are some updates to the previously issued vaccine recommendations. FHV-1 is a member of the family Herpesviridae, while feline calicivirus (FCV) is a member of the Vesivirus genus of the Caliciviridae family.